Routes USA UtahBryce
Bryce Canyon rim

Bryce, Utah, USA

Bryce Canyon rim

Length2.7 mi
Elev. Gain455.9 ft
Est. Steps6000

Forest

Scenic views

Wild flowers

Mountain

Wild life

Bathroom

Created by chrispy_56
Introduction
Bryce Canyon rim is a 2.7 miles (6,000-step) route located near Bryce, Utah, USA. This route has an elevation gain of about 455.9 ft and is rated as medium. Find more routes like this on the Pacer App.
Take the free shuttle bus from the Bryce Canyon National Park Visitor Center and get off at Sunset point, head for the canyon rim. Spectacular views await. Following the rim , head for Sunrise point, it’s a level walk along the rim. At Sunrise point you can take a route down into the canyon, dogs are not allowed. From Sunrise point head back to the visitor center or you can take the shuttle bus back

Bryce Canyon Lodge

Tourist Attraction
Bryce Canyon Lodge is a lodge in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, United States. It was built between 1924 and 1925 using local materials. Designed by architect Gilbert Stanley Underwood, the lodge is an excellent example of National Park Service Rustic design. It is the only remaining completely original structure of the lodges designed by Underwood for Bryce Canyon National Park, Zion National Park and the North Rim of the Grand Canyon.

Bryce Canyon National Park

Place
Bryce Canyon National Park () is an American national park located in southwestern Utah. The major feature of the park is Bryce Canyon, which despite its name, is not a canyon, but a collection of giant natural amphitheaters along the eastern side of the Paunsaugunt Plateau. Bryce is distinctive due to geological structures called hoodoos, formed by frost weathering and stream erosion of the river and lake bed sedimentary rocks.

Bryce Canyon National Park Scenic Trails Historic District

Place
The Bryce Canyon National Park Scenic Trails Historic District comprises the trail system that was developed to allow day hikers to view or to descend into Bryce Canyon National Park's natural amphitheater of eroded sandstone hoodoos from the developed portion of the park on the rim of the Paunsaugunt Plateau.

Bryce Canyon Lodge Historic District

Place
The Bryce Canyon Lodge Historic District surrounds and includes the Bryce Canyon Lodge in Bryce Canyon National Park, as well as the survivors of a large complex of buildings that comprised the core of the park's visitor services area in the 1930s.

Bryce Canyon campground comfort stations

Place
The Loop C Comfort Station and the Loop D Comfort Station are public toilet facilities in Bryce Canyon National Park's North Campground, individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1995 for their significance as structures relating to the park's administrative infrastructure, and for their integrity as examples of rustic architecture.

Bryce Inn

Place
The Bryce Inn, also known as the Bryce General Store, in Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah was designed by architect Gilbert Stanley Underwood and built in 1932. It was the last major building designed by Underwood for the Utah Parks Company. Designed in the National Park Service Rustic style, the Inn served as the center of a set of "housekeeping cabins" for park visitors, providing a cafeteria, laundry and vending facilities.

Old Administration Building (Bryce Canyon National Park)

Place
The Old Administration Building at Bryce Canyon National Park, Utah, U.S.A., also known as the Bryce Canyon Nature Museum, was the first National Park Service building built within the park. Located near Sunrise Point in a heavily used portion of the park, the building was designed by the National Park Service Branch of Plans and Designs in the National Park Service Rustic style preferred at the time for park structures.

Utah Parks Company Service Station

Place
The Utah Parks Company Service Station in Bryce Canyon National Park was built in 1947 to serve automobile-borne visitors to the park. The service station was designed for the Utah Parks Company by architect Ambrose Spence in a style that was sympathetic to the prevailing National Park Service Rustic style, but was much simpler and more modern in character.

Sunrise Point

Tourist Attraction

E.T. Hoodoo

Landform
Route Details

Length

2.7 mi

Elev. Gain

455.9 ft

Est. Steps

6000
Created by
chrispy_56
Open in PacerOpen